Tag Archives: vegetarian

Welcome back!

Our first meeting of the year will be held this Wednesday in CAS 442 at 5:30 and we hope to see all of our current members as well as some new faces! We also would like to encourage you all to bring a friend. Light snacks will be provided but feel free to bring some food of your own. Just be sure to label your goodies (Vegetarian, Vegan, Gluten-Free, Nuts etc.) if you do so! We have a lot to talk about with regards to the coming year some come prepared with some ideas of what you’d like to do within our community. We’re stoked and you should be too; see you soon! 

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Peter Singer at BU

For those of you who missed Peter Singer’s presentation. Enjoy!

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E-Board Elections and Final Potluck

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Join us this Friday May 3rd for the last potluck of the semester. Each guest is encouraged to bring a dish to share, as well as a friend. Additionally, at the potluck, we will be holding elections for the Executive Board positions. All positions are up for re-election and their requirements are listed below. All members are encourage to run for the positions regardless of prior experience.

Positions Include:

Outreach Coordinator (President) – the job of the Outreach Coordinator is to make sure day-to-day that Boston University is vegan and vegetarian friendly. Simply put, the outreach coordinator acts as a point-person. The Outreach Coordinator is required to plan one event per semester as well as one movie screening per semester. The Outreach Coordinator also moderates the meetings to that they stay relatively structured and on task. This does not mean that they talk the most or dominate the meetings in any way.
Volunteer Coordinator (Vice President) – the job of the Volunteer Coordinator is to make sure we have enough volunteers at leafletting and other events. The Volunteer Coordinator bottom-lines monthly leaflets and oversees their distribution. The Volunteer Coordinator must also plan one event per semester.
Public Relations Coordinator (Secretary) – the PR Coordinator’s tasks include taking minutes at each meeting to be used to write the newsletters, sending out the bi-weekly newsletters to the email list, overseeing the Facebook and Twitter accounts as well as working to advertise our events to account for proper event attendance. The PR Coordinator also drafts press releases as necessary for our events.
Activism Coordinato– the job of the Activism Coordinator is generate our own veg activism alongside other activist groups on campus. This position requires that you plan one event in tandem with another activist group on campus per semester as well as a group trip or community service project.
Financial Coordinator (Treasurer) – the Financial Coordinator plans at least one fundraising event per semester (to donate to whichever organization we collectively choose). They also cooperate with the Allocations Board to provide funding for our events. The Financial coordinator also makes sure that there is food at all of our meeting. The Financial Coordinator also ensures that we have food at all our meetings!
And finally…

The job of every Veg Society Member is to check and balance the E-board members!

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Catholicism and the Vegetarian Life

Catholicism and vegetarianism. Not two words that many believe can be connected and until I became both more involved my faith and more aware of the issues surrounding vegetarianism, I also thought that the two ideologies had no connection. I hope in this blog post to show you why I believe Catholics in particular, should consider switching to a vegetarian or vegan diet. For the sake of this post I will use the words vegetarian/vegetarianism to refer to both vegetarian and vegan diets.

After researching vegetarianism, it is clear that it is a better diet for the environment, it is arguably the most ethical diet, and it is a diet that can promote better health. When examining each of these areas, it is easy to see how a vegetarian diet is a way to live out Catholic values.

Environment: The USCCB (United States Conference of Catholic Bishops) names as one of the tenets of Catholic Social Teaching “Care for God’s Creation”. Also, in Genesis, God gives humanity the responsibility of caring for the Earth and all of its creatures. So, even in our modern world, we are called to protect the planet, and take steps to ensure that our lifestyle respects God’s creation. Vegetarianism is one of the ways that Catholics can ensure they are acting as stewards of creation.

Ethics: God told Adam “I have provided all kinds of grain and all kinds of fruit for you to eat” (Genesis 1: 29). God has provided humans with plant-based foods for humans to consume and thrive on. While the Catechism does say we are permitted to eat meat, it also says that animals must be treated humanely to the furthest extent possible. The current abusive factory farming system in place for meat production is a misuse of the responsibility God gave us to care for animals, so Catholics can avoid contributing to this inhumane system by not consuming meat.

Health: In 1 Corinthians, St. Paul says “Don’t you know that your body is the temple of the Holy Spirit, who lives in you and who was given to you by God?” (1 Corinthians 6:19). Because of this, we must care for our bodies with exercise and a clean diet. With vegetarianism, I know that I am providing my body with pure food, given to me by God, that will help me to thrive to the fullest of my potential.

Social Justice: In a broader sense, vegetarianism can also promote social justice to humans in addition to the kindness it shows animals. Much of the land used to grow feed (grain or soy) for the animals in the factory farming system could instead be used to grow food for the poor and hungry in our world. Throughout the Gospels, Jesus calls his followers to care for those in our society who are unable to provide for themselves. By switching to a vegetarian diet, we can help promote fair use of land to grow crops for those living in poverty, rather than to feed the billions of animals part of the factory farming system.

Especially in this Lenten season, when we are called to live in solidarity with the poor and vulnerable and sacrifice our own desires, adopting a vegetarian diet can be a stepping stone to a more compassionate lifestyle. The small sacrifice of giving up meat makes a tremendous difference and can give us the strength we need to live Christ-centered lives.

In closing, I highly recommend that everyone consider a vegetarian lifestyle, regardless of faith background, but especially for Catholics and Christians as a way to help live out the teachings of the Gospel. I will be praying for everyone who reads this post and if you want to chat more about Catholicism or vegetarianism, feel free to email me at spiersa@bu.edu! God Bless!

Susan is a sophomore in the Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences program at Sargent College. She has been a vegetarian for almost four years.

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February Vegetarian Society Events

We’ve got a load of events coming up, check them out!

Tuesday, February 5: 2013 Kickoff Environmental Coalition Potluck
5-6:30pm at 808 Gallery
Come for the Sustainable Futures/Alternative Visions exhibit to get inspired and stay to share common goals for this semester! Some big ticket items we will discuss include the future of urban gardening at BU, and coordinating a massive Earth Week. We will vote on an inclusive theme and collaborate to pull together more funds to support YOUR events!

Sunday, February 10: Team Veg Boston Running Meet-Up
Morning in Porter Square (details TBA)
This is the third annual Team Vegan Boston! We already have BY FAR our largest team of runners coming together, with over 30 people signed up! We’re very excited to have a big showing at Boston’s Run to Remember on May 26th and to raise even more money than last year to help animals! We’re running to support the work of The Humane League, the most active grassroots animal group in the greater Boston area. While we register with the R2R, we will each have our own personal fundraising page on www.teamveganboston.com and will be raising money separately from the R2R. Come out for the first running meet-up!

Friday February 15: Sunday, February 17: Ivy League Veg Conference
4pm on Friday – 3pm on Sunday at Yale University in New Haven, CT (transportation provided)
On February 15-17, 2013 Yale University will host the second Ivy League conference dedicated to exploring the academic basis for plant-based diets and building a cohesive community of activists and advocates. Speakers: Wayne Pacelle, Dr. Wu, Dr. Greger, Dr. Shepherd, Milton Mills, Gidon Eshel, William Crouch.

Thursday, February 21: Movie Screening of “Bethany’s Story” and Q&A Session with the Director.
6pm in KCB 106
This is an incredibly touching film about one girl’s triumph over debilitating health challenges through her own wisdom and determination.  After becoming paralyzed by a bad reaction to medication, Bethany discovered the answer from one of the simplest, most basic things we do every day.  Learn about this solution and why this has been proven to be so powerful for healing.

Friday, February 22nd: Boston College Outreach Extravaganza
10-2pm on all Boston college campuses
Join up with The Humane League of Boston to make sure your school is leafleted with Vegan Outreach’s “Compassionate Choices” pamphlet. Schools already signed up to leaflet: Boston University, WIT, MassArt, NEU.

BU VEG SOCIETY MEETING INFORMATION:

Meeting days alternate between Tuesday and Wednesdays.

Wednesday, February 6th

Tuesday, February 13th,

Wednesday, February 20th

Etc.


Have questions? Email vegsoc@bu.edu

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Animal Friendly New Years Resolutions

Though the start of the new year has come and gone, many may find themselves in the same boat that I find myself in: struggling to define new years resolutions and putting in place goals that will set the tone for the coming days. Below I have listed a few Animal Friendly New Years Resolutions that I’ve been mulling over, ideas that I think can help make 2013 my best year yet.

  • First and foremost, if you’re not already vegan of vegetarian, consider meat-reduction and switching to delicious milk alternative such as soy, almond and coconut milk. Any way that you can reduce the suffering of animals is a step in the right direction.
  • Consider the ways animal products affect other aspects of your life outside of food. Take into account the things you wear as well, and consider moving from leather to pleather and from wool to cotton.
  • Additionally, research the way in which your food choices may also impact human lives. Just because a food is vegan does not mean it’s exempt from causing suffering.
  • Help spread the word! Though it can be intimidating at first, get out on the street and leaflet. Become an active part of your community and promote compassion by hosting a movie screening or baking yummy animal-friendly foods for friends and family.
  • Ask food establishments to serve more vegetarian and vegan friendly options. As more people across the country turn to vegetarianism and veganism, we can actively make a change in what our dining halls on campus and chain restaurants serve to us by turning in suggestions to suggestion boxes and demanding change.
  • Get involved in an organization such as the Humane Society and volunteer your time at domesticated animal shelters in your area.
  • And finally, make time to visit a Farm Sanctuary to remind yourself why we make the choices that we do.

Feel free to comment below with any other Animal Friendly Resolutions that you may have!

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